The Monthly Read – April 2nd

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have Ava DuVernay, how video games demonize “fat” people, teachable trans history, and Nakia is the real revolutionary in Black Panther.

Stay hydrated, LGNers.

1. THE AVA EFFECT | Washington Post
“Forgive us for starting this by focusing on race. But race, fairly or not, is one of the major story lines as DuVernay, 45, readies her big budget adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s young adult classic. She is a black woman in an industry long ruled by white men. “Wrinkle,” which opens March 9, stars Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon and Mindy Kaling, but its heroine is Meg Murry, a character transformed by actress Storm Reid. In the book, Meg is white, 14 and lives in Connecticut. In the movie, she’s an African American teenager from South Central L.A.”

Did you catch “A Wrinkle In Time” yet?

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The Monthly Read – March 5th

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have BLACK PANTHER everything, why teens love reading dystopic novels, and where are the literary prizes for Female writers.

1. The Revolutionary Power Of Black Panther | Time
“If you are reading this and you are white, seeing people who look like you in mass media probably isn’t something you think about often. Every day, the culture reflects not only you but nearly infinite versions of you—executives, poets, garbage collectors, soldiers, nurses and so on. The world shows you that your possibilities are boundless. Now, after a brief respite, you again have a President.

Those of us who are not white have considerably more trouble not only finding representation of ourselves in mass media and other arenas of public life, but also finding representation that indicates that our humanity is multi­faceted. Relating to characters onscreen is necessary not merely for us to feel seen and understood, but also for others who need to see and understand us. When it doesn’t happen, we are all the poorer for it.”

A must read, no spoilers for the movie are in the article. It is only about impact.

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The Monthly Read – February 5th

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have a year without Carrie Fisher, the history of hidden tracks, board games that fight bias, and the Serial Killer Detector.

WAKANDA FOREVER! Black Panther is out in Canada and the world on February 16th. Hope you got tickets ahead of time.

1. A YEAR WITHOUT CARRIE FISHER | Book Riot
“Although I have vague memories of Princess Leia as a child, I didn’t really appreciate Fisher until recently. She was outspoken, brash, and to be blunt, didn’t give a shit what you thought of her. She gave no fucks, and it was glorious. She battled weight issues and the accompanying criticism that comes with that, and was open about her struggles with drug use and sobriety. She was also very open about her diagnosis of bipolar disorder and treatment and their effects on her life, helping to break down the stigma and create public conversations about the illness.”

Long may she reign.

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The Monthly Read – January 8th

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

Happy New Year, Ladies! Woo! We are posting this the second Monday this month because we figured none of y’all gon read this on the first Recovery Day of 2018.

This month we have Thor’s postcolonial perspectives, 30 years of Frasier-verse, and can we just let the Stranger Thing’s kids BE kids!

1. “Thor: Ragnarok”: Marvel From a Postcolonial Perspective | The Village Voice
“Ragnarok director Taika Waititi, an auteur of Māori and Russian-Jewish descent, is one of New Zealand’s premier cinematic exporters, although unlike such Caucasian contemporaries as Jane Campion and Peter Jackson, his work bleeds the hues of indigeneity. Whether it’s as direct as a Māori Dennis the Menace–type kid (Julian Dennison) bonding with a reluctant white father (Sam Neill) in Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016) or as abstract as the outsider experience of Wellington’s long-standing vampire society delineated in What We Do in the Shadows (2014), Waititi’s movies exist at the nexus of native and colonizer cultures, the dichotomy that forms the basis of modern postcolonial theory.”

Taika and his Thor: Ragnarok breaking some visual grounds.

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