The Monthly Read – October 1st

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have Kelly Marie Tran, Michelle Yeoh still kicks ass, there’s no such thing as a feminist brand, and the Valkyries close shop.

1. Kelly Marie Tran: I Won’t Be Marginalized by Online Harassment | New York Times
“Their words reinforced a narrative I had heard my whole life: that I was “other,” that I didn’t belong, that I wasn’t good enough, simply because I wasn’t like them. And that feeling, I realize now, was, and is, shame, a shame for the things that made me different, a shame for the culture from which I came from. And to me, the most disappointing thing was that I felt it at all.”

I see you, Loan Tran.

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The Monthly Read – September 3rd

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have we are all public figures now, have you seen Into The Badlands yet, the history of Haida manga, and the importance of Hannah Gadsby’s Nanette special.

1. WE ARE ALL PUBLIC FIGURES NOW | ella dawson blog
“The woman on the plane is unaware that the woman sitting in the row behind her is watching and recording her every move. Rosey Blair, the stranger she helped sit beside her boyfriend, is projecting a story on top of her interactions that soon takes the internet by storm. Her detailed breakdown of their conversation and body language racks up hundreds of thousands of likes and retweets. Blair herself begins to accumulate thousands of new Twitter followers.

Not long after the plane touches down in Texas, the hordes of strangers following Blair’s tweets are eager to discover the identities of the personal trainers from Dallas. A hunt begins to find her Instagram account. Later the man, her seatmate Euan Holden, participates in the growing media circus because he also gains a ton of twitter followers, or because it helps his career, or because it’s fun, or because it’s just too late to go back to the anonymity of before.”

Don’t play around with stranger’s anonymity. They have the right to theirs as you have the right to yours.

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The Monthly Read – August 6th

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have queerbaiting, YouTube burnout, why did we leave Mr. Roger’s neighbourhood, Indigenous Comic Con, and Bao isn’t about you.

1. There’s a new type of queerbaiting in empty promises | lwl magazine
“For anyone unfamiliar with the term, ‘queerbaiting’ is defined as ‘the practice of hinting at, but then not actually depicting, a same-sex romantic relationship between characters in a work of fiction, mainly in film or television’. Recently a new type of queerbaiting has emerged, where LGBT representation is promised but not delivered within the content itself.”

Its problematic when inclusion after the fact feels empty on delivery.

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The Monthly Read – July 2nd

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have how women see male authors see them, Cowboy Bebop at 20, women who watch X-Files, and the brain behind the twitter handle @Dogrates.

Because they’re all good dogs.

1. How Women See How Male Authors See Them | The New Yorker
“On Easter Sunday, the writer and podcaster Whit Reynolds ripped open a Pandora’s box of secondary sex characteristics when she challenged her Twitter followers to “describe yourself like a male author would.” The responses—of which there are now thousands—don’t so much display a unifying theme as a unifying shape or curvature”

Break the cisgender male gaze streak. Break it by reading more books by Women authors.

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The Monthly Read – June 4th

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have women are allowed to be angry, first female director of a Pixar short is Canadian, ending the cycle of abuse in Guardians of the Galaxy, and another reason to love Kiki’s Delivery Service.

Stay mad, LGNers.

1. What If Girls Knew They Were Allowed to Be Angry? | Elle Magazine
“None of the girls I knew yelled at teachers or ripped up a rude classmate’s homework paper or fought with boys on the playground. None of them had the fire, or if they did, they didn’t show it. They could be sad, or they could be mean, but I only ever saw boys getting angry the way I did. Which is perhaps why I saved my greatest anger for myself, furious with myself for being furious. Anger might have felt easy, but it didn’t feel good. It was lonely.”

Penned by the great Mara Wilson, it’s time women get in touch with their angrier side.

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The Monthly Read – May 7th

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have modern words in Lakota, the subtle racism of orientalism, comics culture wars, learning about the male glance, and Cherry Picks.

Have you all read your Free Comic Book Day freebies yet?

1. How do you say “smartphone” in Lakota? | The Outline
“Over the past six years, Hill and other Lakota speakers have hashed original phrases to encompass newly English concepts such as “smartphone,” “methamphetamines” and “same-sex marriage.”

For Hill, the effort to craft neologisms is key to revitalizing a marginalized language — a tongue the federal government took pains to suppress. Today, the words developed by Hill and other native speakers provide a look into how languages evolve and shape themselves. At Hill’s immersion school, everyone — from teachers to students — tries to speak Lakota 100 percent of the time. Children ages 1 to 5 run through classrooms, and play in areas filled with Lakota picture books. Hill opened the school in 2012 via online fundraising with the mission of reviving the Lakota language, which had only about 2000 speakers left as of 2016, according to the nonprofit Lakota Language Consortium.”

Updating a language, one word at a time.

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The Monthly Read – FCBD Edition

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

Free Comic Book Day is upon us! Visit your local comic book shop for freebies and (probably) deals! If you’ve never heard of FCBD, here’s a primer.

This FCBD edition we have culture wars come for comics books, comic reviews and announcements, and the LGN cubby at Happy Harbor Comics.

We also want to steer people to Calgary’s Panel One Comic Creator Festival in May.

1. The culture wars come to comic books | MacLean’s
“It’s been bubbling for years as Marvel has increased racial, sexual and gender representation, from Kamala Khan, a Muslim teen Ms. Marvel, to Miles Morales, a black-Hispanic Spider-Man. The company also passed the mantles of Thor, Hawkeye, Iron Man and Wolverine on to female characters, gave Captain America’s shield to black superhero Sam Wilson, made a Korean-American teen the Hulk, and had Iceman come out as gay. High-profile writers of colour like Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay joined Marvel’s roster of creators. In response, Marvel and those creators have faced online harassment. “They are legitimately frightened by harassers who threaten to come and find them at conventions, at stores, at their homes,” wrote comic legend Mark Waid in a Facebook post. “One was told she should be burned to death. Another was told that she should be put down like a dog. And those are examples of some of the less hateful attacks.” Earlier this month, a proposed blacklist of writers and artists made the rounds: “Do not buy comics from these people,” the call-to-arms read. “The only way to fix this industry is to get the cancer out.” Even alt-right provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos has weighed in, with a 2015 rant in Breitbart claiming that “progressive hand-wringing and misandry” are ruining a “cherished art form.””

I forgive magazine media for being a bit behind but seeing this article in mainstream media is important and worth pausing for.

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LGN 4th Anniversary – We’ve Come A Long Way, Baby!

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We’ve come a long way, baby.

It’s been 4 years since we started this endeavor but here we are, 4 years old and not looking to shabby. We’ve had screenings, guest speakers, cosplayers, gaming nights, craft markets, and much more and we couldn’t have done it without you LGNers.

So here’s to the LGN family and volunteers that have made these last 4 years special.

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The Monthly Read – April 2nd

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have Ava DuVernay, how video games demonize “fat” people, teachable trans history, and Nakia is the real revolutionary in Black Panther.

Stay hydrated, LGNers.

1. THE AVA EFFECT | Washington Post
“Forgive us for starting this by focusing on race. But race, fairly or not, is one of the major story lines as DuVernay, 45, readies her big budget adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s young adult classic. She is a black woman in an industry long ruled by white men. “Wrinkle,” which opens March 9, stars Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon and Mindy Kaling, but its heroine is Meg Murry, a character transformed by actress Storm Reid. In the book, Meg is white, 14 and lives in Connecticut. In the movie, she’s an African American teenager from South Central L.A.”

Did you catch “A Wrinkle In Time” yet?

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The Monthly Read – March 5th

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Selecting interesting articles, exciting news from the world of comics and pop culture, important editorials, or unique perspective pieces; LGN presents a monthly round up of links to read.

This month we have BLACK PANTHER everything, why teens love reading dystopic novels, and where are the literary prizes for Female writers.

1. The Revolutionary Power Of Black Panther | Time
“If you are reading this and you are white, seeing people who look like you in mass media probably isn’t something you think about often. Every day, the culture reflects not only you but nearly infinite versions of you—executives, poets, garbage collectors, soldiers, nurses and so on. The world shows you that your possibilities are boundless. Now, after a brief respite, you again have a President.

Those of us who are not white have considerably more trouble not only finding representation of ourselves in mass media and other arenas of public life, but also finding representation that indicates that our humanity is multi­faceted. Relating to characters onscreen is necessary not merely for us to feel seen and understood, but also for others who need to see and understand us. When it doesn’t happen, we are all the poorer for it.”

A must read, no spoilers for the movie are in the article. It is only about impact.

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